Reading and Studying the Bible Electronically

From HAVEN NEWS March 2017

Reading has really changed in the 21st Century. Books, magazines and newspapers have gone electronic. Many people now discover the news online, follow their hobbies on websites or Facebook and read novels as e-Books on their iPads or Kindles, and even on iPhones or smartphones. So it is not surprising that people are using these devices to read and study the Bible as well. A very wide range of Bibles and Christian books are available to buy from Amazon and other suppliers to read on e-Book readers like Kindle. All our sermons are posted online every week at www.pbthomas.com/blog and I will offer a list of other recommended websites in a future article. But there are also a number of specialised programs and apps available which help Bible reading and Bible study enormously. As well as lots of different translations of the Bible, they include reading and study guides, devotional notes, commentaries and Christian books. You can search all your content e.g. for words, topics or favourite authors. In each case some of the content is free and some requires payment. Let me recommend three packages which you might like to try for yourself.

Bible Gateway at www.biblegateway.com

Bible Gateway offers a wide variety of Bible translations for free but you need to be online at the time to use most of it.

E-sword  at www.e-sword.net

E-sword offers a number of Bible translations and study aids to download to Windows computers and laptops and Apple devices. You can use most of the content offline but it is not available for Android tablets or smartphones.

Logos 7 at www.logos.com

I have been using Logos software for more than 10 years so that now most of my Bible translations and commentaries are electronic rather than on paper. All this content is always available on my desktop PC, laptop and tablet wherever I am, and even on my Android smartphone (but I only use that with wi-fi to avoid internet charges on the phone). Logos have just launched a Basic version which is completely free. You would probably want to pay for your favourite Bible translation.

For serious Bible study, the advantage of Logos is being able to have a number of Bible translations, and relevant content from commentaries and other books, all on the screen at the same time.  To show how powerful packages like Logos 7 can be, and in case anybody was curious, below is what the screen of my laptop looks like while I am preparing sermons. If anybody wants specific advice about what program or app would suit you best, just ask.

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